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cherie mademoiselle October 31, 2008

Posted by Victoria Fredericks in Fashion, Photography.
5 comments

♥ these photos from Lula magazine of a French model named Siri. Had to share.

Whimsical, doll-like, feminine, beautiful, but with a certain darkness about her. Sumptuous but playful at the same time, which is why I love Lula in general; too bad it’s so expensive (imported things just are. Boo).

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boopsiedaisy July 28, 2008

Posted by Victoria Fredericks in Art, Photography.
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2 comments

“Doll Nut,” “Neo Polly Tan,” “Pam Cake” & “Ceasar Sally.”

I’ve been meaning to do a post on boopsiedaisy for awhile now. I stumbled across her on Etsy and instantly fell in love with her kitschy and frankly quite bizarre fine art prints. I love the injection of pure color, her sense of childlike whimsy mixed with an LA-Halloween-creepshow kind of vibe. Dolls’ heads mixed with food? (Her fantastic “Who’s on the Menu?” series) Crazy original and crazy cool. All her prints have cleverly punned names, too. I’m dying to collect some of her work, the hard part is deciding which prints to pick up.

roadside nostalgia March 21, 2008

Posted by Victoria Fredericks in Culture, Photography, Travel, Vintage.
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Since I absolutely love anything to do with Route 66, vintage road signs and ephemera, 1950’s diners and Americana…here are a few more pictures I’ve gathered. I think these are just so cool!

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Oklahoma

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Vintage ad for Papaburger (good ol’ A&W, it does not get better my friends…I miss the South!)

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Tad’s Chicken n’ Dumplings in Troutdale, Oregon 

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The Steak n’ Shake in Springfield, Missouri

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A cafe in Oklahoma…love the giant fiberglass figures, such an awesome relic!

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Tacoma, Washington

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Henry’s in Cicero, Illinois

Route 66 signs February 4, 2008

Posted by Victoria Fredericks in Photography, Travel.
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3 comments

Just a few of my favorite Route 66 signs I’ve “collected” over the past few years. I’m obsessed with them. Dreaming of that road trip, baby. Before I’m 30…

blue door montage October 24, 2007

Posted by Victoria Fredericks in Culture, Photography, Travel.
9 comments

I am completely fascinated by blue doors. I collect photos of them from around the world. It’s a really cool superstition; blue doors are prevalent in a lot of exotic places around the world (especially in the Mediterranean regions) as they are believed to repel evil. The vast difference in structure and surrounding fascinates me. I’m intrigued by imperfections (peeling paint, signs of wear, etc) and architectural detail, and pulled by the allure of the foreign. I painted my own front door to my apartment blue. It stands out beautifully. It brings something unique to something ordinary. I think I will always have a blue door.

I found this fascinating, from greecetravel.com:

“The ancient Egyptians were furnished with the turquoise-blue stone (cyanus, lapis lazuli) from the Sinai peninsula since the 4th millenium BC. The precious material is found in abundance in Tourkestan where its name originates. It was also known in Cyprus but according to ancient writers, the best quality was the Scythian turquoise, whose origin was most probably Chinese. Today, it is mined in North America (California, Arizona) in Central America (Mexico), in Australia, in North Africa and in Siberia. In North America the artifacts of the Indians decorated with the precious blue stone are well known. In Europe the stone is imported mainly from Iran (province of Isfahan), where the best variation of the stone is found. Its shape is opaque and very hard, but porous, and changes color (it turns to green) and “dies”, when it comes in contact with perfumes and cosmetics.
Its ancient name “cyanus” refers, apart from the mineral stone, to the artificial glass and to the paint as well. The natural turquoise stone decorated mainly jewels and weapons, statues, like the statue of Zeus in Olympia had eyes of turquoise inserted and in this practice the Greeks imagined their Gods and heroes as blue-eyed.
The turquoise paint that the painters used was the product of powder turquoise stone mixed with other ingredients or a mixture of copper from Cyprus and sand. The third and most expensive paint was made with the plant “Indian cyanus” (indigo, bluing). Architectural parts of public buildings, like the triglyphs and mutule of the Parthenon, as well as parts of villas in Pompeii and Rome, were painted in turquoise. In Athens, at Omonia square, on Dorou street No. 1 and on Stadiou street No. 58, blue friezes surround restored neoclassical buildings. Similar friezes are found in the Ionian islands, in the Cyclades, in the islands of the Argosaronic gulf and in Macedonia, in the villages of Mt. Paghaion.
The custom is of worldwide dimension, because even today in provinces of Spain (like in the Mancha of Don Quixote) buildings are decorated with blue bands and designs. Also, houses in Egypt, in the Arab villages of Israel, and entire villages in Moroco, have blue walls. The same turquoise color decorates the houses of Mexican Indians and strongly speaks of common universal civilization features.”

Here, some of my favorite blue door photos from around the world–enjoy.


Morocco


Tunisia


Sarajevo, Bosnia


Gyeongju, Korea


Essaouira, Morocco (by Linda Mathieu)


Asilah, Morocco (this one is just so amazing, the colors)!


Greece


Greece (my personal favorite)!